Eshel Out Loud

News, Views, and Updates from the Eshel Community

Why Orthodox synagogues should welcome gay couples

Why Orthodox synagogues should welcome gay couples

                    A halachic approach to the inclusion of same-sex couples in Orthodox communities by Rabbi Dr. Zev Farber Orthodox Jewish homosexuals in committed relationships who wish to remain part of the community are often stuck having to leave the latter or hide the former. Many Orthodox [more]
Coming Out Orthodox

Coming Out Orthodox

by: Rabbi Haim Ovadia Today I would like to address a question presented to me by many orthodox parents, but first, a brief introduction. It seems that the phrase dreaded by most parents is: Mom, Dad, there's something I need to tell you. Over the years, I have counseled many parents, and have been very [more]

What is Truly Great About America: From Sea to Shining Sea

by Rabbi Steve Greenberg This Thanksgiving my husband, daughter and I are in Columbus, Ohio celebrating with my family. I love going home, for my mother’s marvelous cooking and for her stories. My mother is a holocaust survivor and Thanksgiving was the time when we asked her to share her stories. For years, she did [more]

The biggest challenge to ’emunah’ of our time

By Rabbi Ari Segal, Head of School   Graphic by Gabe Silverstein and Jordan Levine, shalhevetboilingpoint.com, used by permission This op-ed article first appeared in The Boiling Point, the news source of Shalhevet high school. September 14, 2016     In the wake of last summer’s horrific massacre at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, [more]
Some Rabbis Fail, Others Rise Above

Some Rabbis Fail, Others Rise Above

Shlomit Metz-Poolat When rabbis fail, they don’t just fail me or my family, they fail their community as a whole. This is my story, about how rabbis — and so many in my community who followed them — failed us too. All of us. You see, I am a frum (observant) Jew, a mother, a [more]
Why I Still Need Eshel

Why I Still Need Eshel

It's about 7:45 pm on Friday. I'm feeling some pressure about tonight’s dinner, like I don't need Eshel anymore. Like I could be doing something more interesting, or convenient. Or that I should be. When I arrive at the Sixth Street Community Synagogue, there's a small handwritten sign on the gate outside. "Welcome Eshel," it [more]